Lillian G’s story

Although initially born into a loving relationship, Lillian G was supported by her absent father after her parents’ partnership broke down. After her mother gave birth to a child that was not her father’s, this support ended though and Lillian and her siblings were brought up on the poverty line. She spent part of her teens going in and out of the workhouse until she was old enough to go into domestic service and help support her family.

In the mid-1900s she entered a relationship with her cousin, which produced a daughter. When she was pregnant with their next child they finally decided to marry, but her husband left for Australia less than two years later to begin a new life for their family. Lillian was at that time pregnant with their third child, and followed her husband half way across the world about 18 months later, just before the outbreak of the First World War. Their three children went with her. One of these children died of a brain fever in their early years in Australia.

Although her husband had worked as a foreign bank clerk to support his family in England, work of this scale was not forthcoming in Australia, and he instead took a job as a labourer. The area around Brisbane at that time was becoming a less rural environment, and there would have been no shortage of building projects for him. However, this meant that Lillian, who had been brought up in an urban area, was suddenly living in a developing economy.

A further three children had arrived before her husband – who had initially been refused conscription into the army – joined up and was sent back to Europe for the tail end of the First World War, leaving her alone for over a year with many small children. They went on to have a further five children, 11 in all, living in Queensland.

To investigate the women in your ancestry, why not contact Once Upon A Family Tree?

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