Kate C’s story

The business of educating children has a tendency to run in families – teachers will often marry teachers, and their children regularly grow up to become teachers themselves.

Kate C, born in the late 1860s, shows that educators in Victorian Britain often made no exception to this rule.

The third of four sisters, she was born in the home counties while her school teacher father was head of a small rural elementary school. Later on, she moved to South London when her father took up a new head teacher position of a boys’ school. Her mother taught the corresponding girls’ school and Kate and her sisters received their early education there. They lived in the school house, next to the premises.

At the age of eight, however, life began to change for her family. Her father became seriously ill and stepped down from his position for a time. He never recovered, eventually resigning, and later died. Her mother continued to support Kate and her sisters in her teaching position, but resigned herself six months later.

The family went to live a few miles away in a different part of South London, close to Kate’s father’s brother – who was also a school teacher. He may have helped her mother support the family, alongside her mother’s brother who was also close by.

However, when Kate was 14 her mother died too, leaving just over one hundred pounds. At this point, Kate and her sisters needed to find employment to support themselves. Her eldest sister trained as a school teacher herself, as did the youngest sister when she was old enough. Kate and her remaining sister both became children’s nurses for richer families – her sister for a commercial clerk, and Kate herself for a vicar in Dorset who had two small children. Kate was one of several domestic staff in the household.

She does not appear to have trained as a teacher herself, although she would have had the opportunity to do so. With two sisters working as teachers, alongside the teacher uncle who appears to have cared for them, and the fact that her parents also taught, she almost certainly would have possessed a good body of knowledge about passing on knowledge and educational theory – but chose a different path.

By the mid-1890s, however, Kate had met her husband – another school headteacher, who was teaching at a small village school in south Wiltshire. They married in London, close to where several of her sisters were living, and returned to live in the school house in Wiltshire.

Unlike her mother, Kate does not appear to have taken up teaching in her husband’s school – it may have been that later Victorian attitudes prohibited her from doing this, or it may be that she herself wanted to build her family. She had four children – first two girls, although the eldest died aged 18 months, and then two boys.

The youngest boy was born shortly arriving in a north Wiltshire market town, where her husband took a new position as headteacher of a newly-built council elementary school. Their house was close to a railway viaduct, and steam trains would have noisily passed Kate’s front door day and night. Her children attended her husband’s school – but she again did not take up official teaching involvement there. All but one of his female staff were unmarried, and the one exception was a widow without children – Kate may have been prohibited in societal terms from taking up work as a married woman, but equally the family had domestic help so a second wage may not have been needed.

When the First World War broke out, train loads of wounded soldiers were taken to her hometown to be nursed and cared for. Kate volunteered for the Voluntary Aid Division of the local Red Cross, and was involved in nursing these soldiers back to health at the town’s main assembly hall – which had been converted to a temporary hospital for the duration of the war.

By the early 1930s, Kate’s husband retired and they moved to Cheshire – where their elder son was working for a chemicals company. She died there, aged 56. Her husband later remarried, and moved back to Wiltshire.

 

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To submit a woman from your family for inclusion in The Women Who Made Me project, contact Lucy of Once Upon A Family Tree. If you don’t think you have anyone, she begs to differ and can help you discover your female relatives’ lives.

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